Archive for October, 2009

Pic of our baby girl!

27 Oct scan editedWeek 17

Our baby girl! You even greeted us with a wave! 😀

Mama and Papa look forward to each doctor’s visit. We always watch with amazement & delight on your development and growth.

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The Results are Out …

… IT’S A GIRL!

And no Down’s Syndrome!

 

But there’s one area … I think we’d rather not talk about it.

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Nervous

After close to a 4-week wait, we are finally going for our amnio test tomorrow. I’ll be lying if I said I wasn’t nervous, because:

  • there is a 1 in 200 (0.5%) chance of miscarriage
  • there is this possibility that baby may really have Down’s Syndrome

Deep down, we believe our baby is healthy, but we need this test to put all three of us at ease.

This is also the time where we need a lot of spiritual support – AMITABHA BUDDHA …

So Baby, put on your best behaviour, go along with the test, and show us that you are a normal healthy baby and can’t wait to join us next year!

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The West Australian – No TV for children under two

Are they for real? There goes my main source of entertainment!

*sulk*

I hope Papa and Mama can come up with some credible forms of alternative entertainment. And no repeat telecasts, à la MediaCorp!

New federal guidelines for parents and carers say children should be banned from watching television until they turn two, warning that it can stunt language development and shorten their attention span.

The first official recommendations on children’s viewing habits also say television time should be limited to an hour a day for children aged two to five.

They went on to say:

“Based on recent research, it is recommended that children younger than two years of age should not spend any time watching television or using other electronic media (DVDs, computer and other electronic games),” a draft copy of the guidelines, obtained by The Australian, states.

“Screen time… may reduce the amount of time they have for active play, social contact with others and chances for language development.

Article here and video here.

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Kangaroo care

Surfing the Motherhood forum, I learnt something new today: kangaroo care.

According to Wikipedia,

Researchers have found that the close physical contact with the parent can help to stabilize the infant’s heartbeat, temperature, and breathing. Researchers also have found that mothers who use kangaroo care often have more success with breastfeeding and improve their milk supply.

While I definitely will be trying it out, I just hope Baby won’t confuse Papa’s boobies with Mama’s. They are QUITE the same.

Image credits here and here.

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Cost of university education

This appeared in Sunday’s papers, and Tuesday’s Asiaone. Want to re-produce the article here for record.

WARNING: Long post ahead.

table

Time to redo your sums

Nest egg for children’s university education could fall short due to economic crisis. -ST

Tue, Oct 06, 2009
The Straits Times

By Lorna Tan, Senior Correspondent
 
Last Thursday was Children’s Day and a timely reminder to parents to review plans for funding that most crucial investment: their children’s university education.
 
One important question: Are savings targets that parents may have set in the good times still achievable given that we are still stumbling out of this economic crisis?  
 

Parents should take stock to evaluate where their investments are heading, and to re-think their strategies and their risk appetites.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Couvade syndrome

Lately I’ve not been sleeping well, often taking a long time to fall asleep. Waking up a few times in the middle of the night has also become the norm.

Not too long ago, I also started developing a sweet tooth, bulldozing through anything that’s sweet and savoury. Not too sure if the nauseous feeling after that had anything to do with the expiry date, but anyway … 

Then I learnt about this: Couvade syndrome. The French word is pronounced as “koo vard“.

According to Wikipedia, it is a condition in which an individual close to an expectant mother, commonly her partner, experiences some of the same symptoms and behavior as the mother near the time of labour. 

Symptoms include stomach pain, indigestion, changes in appetite, weight gain, diarrhoea, constipation, headache, toothache, cravings, nausea, breast augmentation, and insomnia.

Ahhh, no wonder!  So, Ben & Jerry’s, anyone??

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